PORTUGUESE COASTAL CAMINO

The lesser walked Camino along the Atlantic coast

The Portuguese Coastal Camino route is ideal for those who love coastal scenery as well as for the more adventurous walker.

You will find slightly less signage (until you enter Redondela – where the coastal track joins with the traditional Portuguese route and becomes well signed) and fewer fellow pilgrims than on the Spanish Camino. The locals are very friendly and willing to help!

The coastal route offers a choice of two paths and if you take the seashore path you will be walking on coastal tracks, beaches, old Roman roads and forest tracks crossing old villages and cities born from the Camino trail.

There is some walking alongside the road, especially when walking into Vigo and also into Santiago on the last day but for the most part footpaths, tracks and beaches.

With its sunny climate, gorgeous beaches, picturesque towns, historic sites and delicious food, the Portuguese Camino is the perfect destination to hike, feast, dance and relax.

PORTUGUESE COASTAL CAMINO

The raw travel difference

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THE BEST AUTHENTIC ACCOMMODATION

We have sourced the best authentic, quality local accommodation. From beautiful Parador hotels to charming casa rurales, with friendly hosts and wonderful food, so that you can delight in your surroundings and wake refreshed each day. A unique feature of our trip is a 2-night stay at the Baiona Parador, with a visit to the nearby historical town of Tui.

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OUR OWN OPERATIONS & GROUND SUPPORT

We are the most established Australian operator on the Camino - we book all your arrangements directly, and with our long-standing relationships with hotels you'll be well looked after. Our own ground managers will brief you on arrival in Portugal. They will give you reassurance & support on your Camino adventure.

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FLEXIBLE TRIPS TAILORED TO YOU

We listen to what you want and tailor the walking to your ability and timeframes, giving you the experience you want, not what's easiest for us! We can vary the length of stages and find the accommodation that best suits your needs and budget.

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BEAUTIFUL COASTAL WALKING, 2 COUNTRIES

We offer the route less trodden, taking the coastal paths where most walkers follow the inland route and miss the great Atlantic coast scenery. You'll get cooler temperatures and much more interesting walking days with ever-changing views and fewer people on the trail. We walk through a diverse landscape of vineyards, forests and fishing villages on this coastal trail, and all you carry is your daypack.

RAW Travel walking map

PORTUGUESE Coastal Camino

Our own guidebook & App

RAW Travel has written and published its own guidebook on the Portuguese Coastal Camino, which when used in conjunction with our proprietary walking app means you have the best possible information and route guidance for your trip. We are the only walking company to produce our own guidebook to this complex route and with the backup of our locally based staff it means you’ll have full confidence in walking this route and enjoying your Camino ( and be able to help others who are lost!)

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PORTUGUESE COASTAL CAMINO

Douro river , Porto Portugal
18 Days

Portuguese Coastal Camino

Porto to Santiago – Portuguese Coastal Camino

Moderate Self-Guided
  • Savour the slower pace of this much quieter Camino
  • Memorable encounters with friendly locals along the way
  • Rest or explore with a free day in Porto, a vibrant and fascinating riverside city
  • Make an optional visit to Tui or a day trip to the Cies Islands
from

$3,550.00

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Porto, Portugal
18 Days

Portuguese Coastal Camino

Porto to Santiago Group Trip – Portuguese Coastal Camino

Moderate Self-Guided
  • Savour the slower pace of this much quieter Camino
  • Memorable encounters with friendly locals along the way
  • Rest or explore with a free day in vibrant Porto
  • Make an optional visit to Tui or a day trip to the Cies Islands
from

$3,550.00

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Porto Waterfront
15 Days

Portuguese Coastal Camino

Porto to Santiago: The Essentials Trip – Portuguese Coastal Camino

Moderate Self-Guided
  • A faster paced trip with coastal and rural scenery with abundant historic relics
  • Modest, well located, clean, comfortable hotels with private bathrooms
  • Add an extra night or arrange your own additional accommodation
  • Luggage transfers, breakfasts, in-country support staff
from

$1,995.00

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Portugal esplande
9 Days

Portuguese Coastal Camino

Porto to Baiona – Portuguese Coastal Camino

Moderate - Challenging Self-Guided
  • Soak up spectacular Portuguese coastal scenery
  • Walk along this quiet but friendly Camino
  • Fishing villages, seaside communities, beachside resorts and historic towns
  • Remains of old Roman roads, coastal paths, boardwalks and beaches 
from

$1,895.00

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Portugal_gallery0000
10 Days

Portuguese Coastal Camino

Baiona to Santiago – Portuguese Coastal Camino

Moderate Self-Guided
  • Beautiful Galician scenery; seascapes, vineyards and shady forests
  • Walk approx. 130km enabling you to receive a Compostela
  • Local delicacies especially amazing seafood including oysters and pulpo
  • Magnificent accommodation with a complimentary upgrade
from

$1,995.00

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Portugal walkers
16 Days

Portuguese Coastal Camino

Baiona to Finisterre – Portuguese Coastal Camino

Moderate - Challenging Self-Guided
  • Solitude, mindfulness and reflection on the ‘Camino less travelled’
  • Fishing villages, beach walks, excellent seafood and wine
  • Exceptional walking along the wild Atlantic coast
  • 2 nights in the magnificent Parador hotel in Baiona
from

$2,850.00

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Lisbon Tram
38 Days

Portuguese Coastal Camino

Lisbon to Santiago – Portuguese Coastal Camino

Moderate - Challenging Self-Guided
  • Explore Lisbon’s abundant history, fine cuisine and lively culture
  • Fresh cod and grilled sardines the world famous ‘Pastéis de Nata’ 
  • Lush fields, olive and citrus groves, beautiful beaches and wild coastlines 
  • Roman remains, old Knights Templar towns, Moorish bastions
from

$6,450.00

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Portuguese Camino Route Map

Lisbon

Portugal’s capital is an enchanting must-see destination – alluring alleys, quaint shops, Gothic cathedrals, impressive bridges, colourful neighbourhoods and vintage trams.

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Vila Franca de Xira

The beautiful town of Vila Franca de Xira was founded by French followers of Portugal’s first king, Afonso Henriques, around 1200. The town is mostly famous for its bull-running festivals in July and October.

Santarém

The small city of Santarém contains the largest amount of gothic churches in Portugal as well as quaint old cobbled streets, ceramic-tiled facades, graceful church portals, museums and fabulous restaurants.

Golegã

The charming equestrian town of Golegã has a great horse-breeding and agricultural tradition. One of the town’s star attractions is the parish church, Igreja Matriz, which was originally founded by King Manuel I and features an impressive 16th-century façade.

Tomar

Tomar was the last Knights Templar town to be commissioned for construction. This medieval pilgrim town is one of Portugal’s historical jewels and a UNESCO World Heritage site. To this day, Tomar retains much of the original layout and architecture of the Templar period. The impressive Aqueduct of Pegões is behind the fortress. Also worth visiting is the 15th century synagogue, said to be the oldest in Portugal, and the many important churches.

Coimbra

Coimbra was once the capital of Portugal. With its cathedrals, churches, university, museums, narrow streets of the old town and lively atmosphere it is a treat to explore on foot. The main square, the Largo da Portagem, is the place to be for outdoor cafes and restaurants.

Mealhada

This town is located in an area famous for its wine making and Mealhada-style roast suckling pig – the symbol of the local gastronomy.

Águeda

Águeda, on the river of the same name, is a large town with many shops and restaurants. In the shady Parque da Alta Villa there are lots of painted pig statues!

Sao Joao da Madeira

The industrial town of Sao Joao da Madeira specialises in the production of shoes and hats. The old hat-making factory is now a museum and has exhibits describing the old hat-making process.

Grijó

The most famous site in Grijó is the Monastery of St Salvador, which dates back to the 13th century. The gardens are shady and inviting, a perfect place to enjoy the silence and to contemplate.

Porto

Porto is one of the most ancient cities in Europe. It has many architectural highlights, the picturesque Ribeira riverfront and UNESCO heritage listed colourful historic old town. No visit to Porto is complete without a river cruise to the port wine sellers of the Douro Valley, a UNESCO world heritage wine region. While you’re in Porto, seek out the city’s namesake dish, Tripas à Moda do Porto, and its most popular sandwich, the Francesinha. You’ll easily burn off the calories if you are starting your pilgrimage from this beautiful seaside port.

Póvoa de Varzim

This is a modern resort and holiday town. The town’s main appeal is the beach. There is also a historic centre and shopping streets.

Esposende

Esposende is a popular resort and fishing town. Along the riverside runs a wide palm-lined boulevard. The broad beach at the mouth of the Cávado River is known for its quality surf. Backed by low dunes the beach is overlooked by the 17th century Forte de São João Baptista and the red metal tower of Esposende lighthouse.

Viana do Castelo

Classified as a mecca of architecture, Viana do Castelo is famous for its monuments in and around the city, and the surrounding natural beauty of its beaches and seafront. You can visit the 15th century cathedral and take the funicular to the Basilica de Santa Lucia on the hill above the town for some of the best views of the West Atlantic coast.

Vila Praia de Ancora

The old fishing village of Vila Praia de Ancora has a great beach and is popular with tourists. The town has an excellent reputation for gastronomy. The festival of the Sea and Sardines is held in early July.

A Guarda

The fishing port of A Guarda has a pretty harbour and Galicia’s most impressive ancient Celtic settlement – the Santa Tecla on the hill above the town is an authentic archaeological gem with breathtaking views of the Atlantic Ocean.

Oia

As you approach the small town of Oia you will see the spectacular 12th-century Monastery of Santa Maria de Oia across the small harbour. The pretty town has several restaurants, and you may find some locals engaged in an impromptu sing along with bagpipes playing typical Galician tunes.

Baiona

Baiona is the most popular seaside tourist town in southern Galicia and has a well preserved old town and numerous important monuments. It was here in 1493 that the Caravel La Pinta returned with news of the discovery of America by Columbus. A replica is moored in the harbour. From Baiona you can travel to the nearby historic town of Tui with its cathedral (a highlight of the inland Central Camino) or to take a ferry trip to the heavenly Cies Islands, which are known as the Caribbean of Spain.

 

Vigo

Vigo is a busy, cosmopolitan industrial city. The Old Town (Casco Vello) is the city’s heart, packed with lively bars and restaurants serving delicious Galician dishes.

Redondela

The town of Redondela is known as the ‘Village of Viaducts’. It’s where the Coastal and Senda Litoral Camino’s join with the inland Central Portuguese Camino to Santiago de Compostela.

Pontevedra

Pontevedra has a pretty historic centre, pedestrianised streets, plazas and a wonderful atmosphere to soak up. The famous Pilgrim Virgin’s church (Santuario da Peregrina) appears round but is actually in the shape of a scallop shell.

Caldas de Reis

The Roman-influenced town of Caldas de Reis, known as ‘the hot waters of the Kings’. You’ll find the thermal springs after crossing the River Umia.

Padrón

Padrón was said to be where the body of St James first reached land when it returned by boat after being martyred in Jerusalem. The parish church has the legendary Pedron, the stone where St James’ boat was moored. You can find the Pedron under the altar in the Igrexia de Santiago with a replica Pedron over the bridge on the west bank of the Rio Sar.

Santiago de Compostela

The wonderful and historic city of Santiago is the end of the Camino journey for most pilgrims. Praza do Obradoiro and the wonderful ancient Cathedral form the city’s heart. Attend the midday pilgrims mass and watch the steady stream of pilgrims arriving into the square as they finish their epic journey. There are many enticing tapas bars and restaurants in which to celebrate your journey.

 

Camino De Santiago destination guide

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Discover inspiration, travel essentials, practical information and more in our free Destination Guide. All you need to know about walking the Camino de Santiago routes through Spain, Portugal and France!

Walking the Camino is an incredible journey that will immerse you not only in Europe’s grand history, food and culture but most importantly the extraordinary camaraderie that exists along these routes. The spirit of the Camino de Santiago is alive and well among people from all over the world. It is a ‘bucket list’ experience you will never forget!

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PORTUGUESE COASTAL CAMINO

Frequently Asked Questions

How many kilometres is the Portuguese Camino?

The total distance of the Portuguese Coastal Camino from Lisbon to Santiago is 620km. Most people start in Porto (260km) and traverse the Atlantic Coast of Portugal before heading inland after Pontevedra in Spain and then all the way to Santiago. Our itineraries follow closely along the Portuguese and Galician coastlines using the Portuguese Camino da Costa (Coastal Way) and the Portuguese Camino da Senda Litoral (Seashore Path). On most days you will walk from 20–30km. The time spent walking can vary between 5 and 8 hours depending on your walking speed. Allow 7 to 9 hours to complete the day.

How does the Portuguese Camino differ from other Camino routes?

The Portuguese Coastal Way is a stunning alternative to other Camino routes, including the traditional Camino de Santiago. It is characterised by picturesque coastal landscapes, charming towns, and beachside paths. It’s less crowded than the Camino Francés, so pilgrims can appreciate a quieter and more contemplative experience, with fewer people on the trail and in accommodations. In addition, the Portuguese Coastal way is a less-signed Camino, meaning it is great for those who are seeking more of a challenge and adventure. If you complete more than 100km of this way, you are still eligible to receive your Compostela.

Has the Portuguese Camino become more popular?

Portugal’s sunny Mediterranean climate, gorgeous beaches, picturesque towns, historic sites and delicious food make this walk highly appealing. The popularity of the Portuguese Coastal Camino has been steadily increasing in recent years, particularly by walkers looking for an alternative to the more traditional Camino Frances. Even though it’s the second most popular route after Spain’s Camino, there are still significantly fewer pilgrims on the trail.

What is the signage like on the Portuguese Camino?

Similarly to the other pilgrim routes, the way is marked with a familiar yellow arrow. Some sections along the Portuguese Coastal Camino are not very well signposted. Keep the coast to your left. The markers become more prominent once the Coastal Way meets the Central Way in Redondela. We have published our own guidebook on the Portuguese Coastal Camino, which when used in conjunction with our walking navigation app means you have the best possible information and route guidance for your trip. 

What type of accommodation can I expect?

For our walks on the Portuguese Coastal Camino, we have sourced the best authentic, quality local accommodation. From beautiful Parador hotels to charming casa rurales, with friendly hosts and wonderful food, so that you can delight in your surroundings and wake refreshed each day. A unique feature of our trips is a stay at the Baiona Parador, with a visit to the nearby historical town of Tui.

What are the best starting points for the Portuguese Camino?

Although it’s possible to begin in Lisbon, most people start their journey on the Portuguese Coastal Camino in Porto. With its many port cellars, cafes and wine bars along the riverfront, plus markets, old town and magnificent baroque and tile-coated buildings, Porto is a great place to explore and offers an exciting and memorable way to start your Camino.

How is the Coastal route different to the Central route?

The Portuguese Coastal Camino is more picturesque than the traditional and more well-trodden inland Camino Central (Central Way), which misses the great Atlantic coast scenery. You’ll get cooler temperatures and much more interesting walking days with ever-changing views and fewer people on the trail. We walk through a diverse landscape of vineyards, forests and fishing villages on this coastal trail. Our itineraries take in interesting sights along the way, including the beautiful towns of Viana do Castelo, Baiona, Caminha and Pontevedra, most of which date back to Roman times.

Does the Portuguese Camino connect with other Camino routes?

After Vigo, the Portuguese Coastal Camino merges with the Coastal Way to Redondela and from here this route converges with the Portuguese Central Way and continues through to Santiago de Compostela.

Can the Portuguese Camino be walked in stages?

You can walk the entire length of the Portuguese Coastal Camino from Lisbon to Santiago (38 days) or choose a shorter section. Most people walk from Porto to Santiago (18 days). If you have less time, walking from Porto to Baiona is a popular option. Some walkers choose only the Spanish section and walk from Baiona to Santiago.

Are there any festivals worth a look?

Every year from 12–14 June, Lisbon honours its most respected saint with a sardine festival. The first of several saints’ days celebrated in Portugal, it marks the beginning of the city’s many summer festivities. If you are visiting Portugal at this time then you should definitely check it out.

What should I pack for the Portuguese Camino?

Because Portugal sits on the Atlantic coast, the weather can change rapidly – you will need to pack wet weather gear regardless of what time of year you choose to walk. Ensure that all clothing items are quick-drying and breathable and choose items that are well worn to prevent chafing or rubbing. Always wear a good hat for sun protection. On hot days you can take a dip in the ocean, so don’t forget to pack your bathers.

What is the weather like along the Portuguese Camino?

The proximity to the Atlantic Ocean ensures that this Camino is perfect for the summer months. April through to October are all good options to walk, with June to August being the ideal months for this walk.

Can solo travellers walk the Portuguese Camino?

Overall, walking the Portuguese Coastal Camino is very safe. Our local support person will brief you on arrival in Portugal, and provide reassurance and support during your journey should you need it. We have long-standing relationships with our hotels, so you will be well looked after. Our priority is your safety and if there are extreme weather events or other unexpected issues, will provide you with important information during your trip.

Are there organised tours on the Portuguese Camino?

The Portuguese Coastal Camino is very well suited to self-guided walking. If you would like the company of like-minded travellers on your trip, our group self-guided trips with set departure dates are a great option and perfect for solo travellers.

What are the key towns along the Portuguese Camino?

On the Portuguese Coastal Camino there are stunning coastal villages and towns to explore with a wealth of architectural sites and amazing seafood, including Porto, Viana do Castelo, A Guarda, Redondela, Baiona and Pontevedra, and of course the magnificent Santiago de Compostela.

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