length

4 Days

difficulty

Moderate - Challenging

trip cost

From $325 pp

Icons / stylised / time Created with Sketch.

length

4 Days

Icons / stylised / difficulty Created with Sketch.

difficulty

Moderate - Challenging

Icons / stylised /cost Created with Sketch.

trip cost

From $325 pp

'Adventure in a box'

Independent Adventures

  • Overview
  • Highlights
  • Itinerary
  • On the trail
  • Inclusions
  • FAQ's
  • Positive impacts

Overview

Walls of Jerusalem

The Walls of Jerusalem National Park is located in Tasmania’s spectacular Wilderness World Heritage Area, on the state’s expansive central plateau area, east of the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park. Unlike its more popular cousin, Cradle Mountain, this area is less visited, giving you the feeling of being far more remote.

The park’s dominating feature—a series of majestic high craggy hills, carved over time by glaciers—are interspersed with stunning  tarns and glacial valleys. 

This pristine alpine gem, explorable only on foot, is remote mountain wilderness at its very best and is most suited to experienced, self-sufficient hikers who are well-equipped for remote conditions and can handle wiry, rugged and often changing weather conditions.

The park’s name is derived from its unique geological peaks which according to its first surveyor James Scott in 1949 were reminiscent of the Walls of Jerusalem. Throughout the park today you’ll encounter features with names that carry on this biblical theme — Ephraim’s Gate, Zion’s Gate, Herod’s Gate, Pool of Bethesda, Pool of Siloam, Wailing Wall and The Temple.

You can expect some of Tasmania’s most impressive scenery and whilst some of the walks may be difficult in part, your effort is rewarded by jaw-dropping landscapes.

Pool of Bethesda located in the Walls of Jerusalem National Park in Tasmania. This one of Tasmania's prized wilderness world heritages sites.

Highlights

Walls of Jerusalem

  • One of Australia’s most impressive wilderness hikes
  • Stunning highland lakes
  • Awe-inspiring views from mountain peak summits
  • Ancient pencil pine plantations dating back over 1000 years 
  • Stunning native flora including beautiful wildflowers
  • Changing alpine weather conditions 

Our Independent Adventures range begins with trip departures from 4th January 2021

Itinerary

Walls of Jerusalem

At a Glance

The national park area spreads out with the various peaks, lakes and highlights dotted throughout. This provides walkers with a range of itinerary options, from longer, more challenging, walks of six days that venture into more remote areas and camping spots (best suited to more experienced hikers), to a shorter classic circuit hike of four days where you camp one night at Wild Dog Creek, one night at Dixons Kingdom and one night at Lake Adelaide.

There is also the possibility of just doing Mt Jerusalem peak on either a day or overnight hike. The most popular circuit is outlined below.

Day 1: Mersey Forest Road Carpark - Wild Dog Creek (passing Trappers Hut): 6km/3–4 hours

A rewarding first day’s hike into pure Tasmanian wilderness. A challenging ascent through eucalyptus dominated forest and via the historic 20th Century Trappers Hut sees you reach the edge of the plateau and from here the grandeur of this magnificent alpine region starts to emerge. Discover the stunning, sparkling mountain tarns of Solomon’s Jewels and encounter ancient conifer forest, snow gum and pencil pines, cleverly adapted to the harsh alpine conditions and replace eucalyptus. Exquisite views of King David’s Peak from your camp for the night at Wild Dog Creek.

Day 2: Wild Dog camp to Dixons Kingdom camp (via Herod's Gate, Pool of Bethesda and Damascus Gate): 3km/1.5–2 hours

Delve deeper into the national park as you hike into the central Walls of Jerusalem basin area. Entering through Herods Gate, with the dolerite peaks of Mt Ophel and King Davids Peak flanking each side, be wowed by the vastness and sheer beauty of this UNESCO world Heritage area. Skirt around Lake Salome then the Pool of Bethesda to reach the imposing Damascus Gate, set between Solomons Throne and The Temple. Decent through beautiful pencil pine forest to the green inviting grasslands of Dixons Kingdom – your base for the night.

Day 3: Dixons Kingdom camp to Lake Adelaide camp (via Lake Ball): 4.6km/2.5 hours

A challenging descent today and a greater feeling of remoteness as you head off trail on an unmarked route through the valley of Jaffa Vale headed for Lake Ball. Pass through large pencil pine forest before reaching the lake’s shores. The historically significant Lake Ball Hut, originally built in 1968, pays homage as a place of peace for bushman and returned POW soldier Ray Miles. Following the shores of Lake Ball, the track descends through eucalyptus forest then low lying shrubland including brightly coloured cushion plants and small streams to the shores of Lake Adelaide. On the northern shores of Lake Adelaide is your rest point for the night.

Day 4: Lake Adelaide Camp to Mersey Forest Road: 9km/3–4 hours

A last chance to wake up to the pristine fresh alpine air and incredible landscapes of the national park before it’s time to head back to civilization. Heading north, through a wet and swampy valley scattered with pretty lakes and small tarns, pass Stretcher Lake, Lake Loane and Howells Bluff before travelling through eucalyptus forest back to the Trappers Hut. The track descends steeply back to the starting point, completing your circuit walk.

The Walls of Jerusalem National Park is part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. The park contains alpine vegetation and endemic conifer forests amid a high plateau of dolerite peaks. The landscape features found within the park include moraines and numerous tarns and lakes.

On the trail

The Experience

This remote wilderness walk travels through wild alpine terrain. It includes a combination of installed wooden boardwalks, impacted stone paths and uneven rocky trails, through to some untracked rough bushwalking, dry forested paths and wet, marshy shrubland. When embarking on the various peaks, expect lots of steps with some moderate to quite steep climbs. There are also some rock scree sections with some scrambling required. Slippery surfaces from exposed tree roots can also be present. In snowy conditions, please note that the trails through the park have limited snow markers which can make finding your way harder—be prepared by having alternative navigation tools with you such as a compass and map.

Inclusions

What's Included?

Included
  • Our detailed guide to hiking the Walls of Jerusalem – contains all the essential information you need to know in advance
  • 4 days worth of food for your adventure; breakfast, lunch and dinner each day – delivered straight to your home
  • Our own range of Lightweight, highly nutritious meals that are locally sourced, delicious and easy to carry & cook ( freeze dried and dehydrated)
  • National Parks Pass (required)
  • Bookings for your campsites  (pre-requisite)
  • Our ‘state of the art’ Navigation app to guide you on the track; showing huts, campsites and all points of Interest along the way
  • Delivery to your door* of our ‘Adventure in a box’ food parcel
  •  We can also arrange services such as pre- and post – trip accommodation at additional cost (see FAQ’s)
  • 10% GST included

* Additional $35 food delivery charge for any locations in NT, WA and Northern Queensland

Not Included
  • Trailhead transfers or transport to Walls of Jerusalem National park
  • Any equipment required

FAQ's

Need to Know

How fit do I need to be?

The Walls of Jerusalem is rated by us as a moderate-challenging walk and best suited to hikers of reasonably good fitness and experience, who are confident walking in remote locations. You should be able to carry a full pack for up to 4-5 hours. At least 1 person in your party should have experience in off-track walking and navigation. RAW Travel has a detailed guide specifically for multi-day walk training, you will receive this as part of your booking.

Can you hire gear and equipment locally?

There are a number of outdoor gear hire companies in Tasmania that can help outfit you with
equipment for this trip and full details are given in our information guide.

How do you access the trailhead?
FLIGHTS

Qantas, Jetstar and Virgin Australia service Tasmania, with the main airports located at Launceston and Hobart. If you are travelling to Tasmania with the main purpose of hiking the Walls of Jerusalem, we recommend you fly into Launceston (2 hours drive from airport carpark). 

Check all airlines when making your bookings – you may be surprised with the options available. 

TRANSFERS

There is no public transport to the Walls of Jerusalem National Park. From the airport, you can book a transfer through a private transfer company or hire a car and drive yourself. 

Pre-book either option. RAW Travel can book a private transfer for you (additional cost) or you can book directly. We List transport operators in our guide who can assist with providing transport to the Mersey Forest Road carpark. 

ARRIVING BY CAR

If you live in Tasmania and have your own car, or are hiring a car in Tasmania then your car can be left in a carpark while you are walking the track. The carpark is located off the Mersey Forest Road, near Lake Rowallan. From there you will then need to walk into the park entrance on foot which is a 30-minute uphill walk.

What's involved with an Independent adventure?

Independent adventures place you at the centre of the experience, giving you the confidence to be a self-reliant walker on the trail. We take care of the research needed and give you all the essential information relating to the trip ( a task that seasoned walkers can tell you often takes many hours to get the correct information) so you can be thoroughly prepared and confident that you have  everything you need for your adventure. We give you all the contacts &  details to nearby transportation, accommodation and hire services,  highlight any risks to be aware of and how to mitigate them.

The food prep is a major hassle of many hikers trips and we solve that for you. We prepare all the food that you need for your trip, all pre-measured and dehydrated / freeze dried to take away the weight but keep the freshness. Our meals are reviewed by Nutritionists to provide the right daily nutrition and energy for your demands of the walk. And our ingredients are prepared from the best local ingredients here on the Mornington Peninsula, cooked to order and freeze dried fresh – not sitting on a shelf for years at a time!

Once you arrive at the trail it’s all over to you the adventure begins!  You are free and independent to create your own experience the way you want it. We provide you with an app to help you navigate in real time on the trail and give you the campsite locations and points of interest but you are completely autonomous & self – supporting on the walk.  These trips are best suited to people who relish that sense of liberation and freedom that comes with being self-reliant and don’t need the back up of a leader or group travel. Independent Adventures are different from our other self – guided walking trips as there are no briefings, transfers or local support from RAW Travel staff. It’s just you and nature out on the trail!

Can you walk this trail solo?

Unless you are an experienced walker then it is not recommended to walk this solo due to the isolation of this area and the unpredictable weather that Tasmania’s highlands are known for. The weather is notoriously unpredictable in this exposed alpine area and walkers have to be fully prepared for conditions that can seem ‘unseasonal’ and very changeable. You should carry an EPRIRB / PLB for safety. The trail is well marked though and there are communal campsites to head to each evening.

What are the camping areas like?

Along the track, you’ll find three designated campsites located at Wild Dog Creek, Dixons Kingdom and Lake Adelaide.

Wild Dog Creek, near Herod’s Gate, is located 6km from the main carpark and offers tent platforms, a toilet and rainwater tank.

Note: tent platforms are not pre-bookable and all campgrounds work on a first-come, first-served basis.

Dixons Kingdom is located 3.7km (1.5–2 hour walk) from Wild Dog Creek campsite (and 10km from the carpark/3.5–5 hour walk). It has a toilet and water is available from a nearby creek (east of walking track). There are no tent platforms here, however there is a grassy area (east of the toilet and hut area) where you can pitch a tent. Do not pitch your tent near the historical hut (it may ruin it for other hikers) or camp underneath the pencil pine trees. This avoids destruction to their environment and also avoids injury to you from falling branches.

The Lake Adelaide campsite is located on the northern shore of the lake. It is an informal campsite which simply offers an open grass area to pitch your tent. There are no toilet facilities here or tent platforms. This campsite is 5km from Dixons Kingdom campsite (2 hour walk).

When pitching tents at Dixons Kingdom and Lake Adelaide campsite please take care to avoid unnecessary destruction of the sensitive plant life of the area.

Wild camping is discouraged; always use designated campsites. If, due to an emergency situation, you need to camp away from the campsites, avoid camping near waterways where soil erosion can have environmental impact and always adhere to the ‘Leave no Trace’ principles.

You will encounter three historical wooden huts at Trappers Hut, Dixons Kingdom and Lake Ball. Please treat these simple huts with respect. Camping in (or directly next to) these huts is not allowed unless in an emergency situation.

The cost for camping in the national park is covered as part of your park’s pass. 

When is the best time to go?

In Tasmania, snow, rain, wind and sun are all possible at any time of the year, and bushfires can occur between October and March. Hiking from December to April will give you longer days and warmer weather. 

Whichever season you choose, to make the most of your time here you must be well prepared with your clothing, equipment and supplies as you venture into this remote area. 

What's the terrain like?

The terrain over the course of the walk is varied including uneven rocky trails; untracked rough bush sections; marshy shrubland; rocky sections and climbing over rocky scree, with scrambling required. There will also be exposed tree roots which are often slippery.  Always walk with extreme care and be aware of your footing. Summits on the walk are quite exposed. Don’t climb up Solomons Throne or onto the West Wall by any route other than the track and for your safety don’t attempt to climb any of the summits during adverse weather conditions.

Postitive_Impacts_Planet-header

Positive impacts

Social and environmental

All our adventures are fully carbon offset so that you know your travel has minimal impacts. Hiking itself is a low impact activity but we offset the cost of all our office operations and food production as well, so you can be satisfied that you have chosen a form of travel that is both good for you and good for the planet. Each year we also plant trees on behalf of every customer who has travelled with us, aiming to build towards a carbon positive effect with our operations.

As a B-Corp a focus on local community is an important part of who we are. We are committed to buying locally and source our produce from growers here on the Mornington Peninsula. We care about people in our community and for every meal pack you buy with us we donate a meal to a homeless support charity, to spread some love and share good food with those who need it most.

 

TRIP date selection

when would you like to travel?

Please select your preferred dates for on-demand trips or select a scheduled date for group departures. If you have booked a self-guided trip please understand that because your trip date is on demand and we must check availability of all properties on your chosen dates before it can be fully confirmed

SELECT PREFERRED DATES

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